Connecticut Dairy:
Part of the Climate Solution

Connecticut is home to about 90 dairy farming families. When you buy dairy, you’re choosing local foods that are good for you, your community, and the planet. 

Connecticut dairy farmers work hard every day to produce high-quality milk, protect open spaces, and support local economies.

On this page, learn about Connecticut dairy and its contribution to a sustainable food system. Plus, get kid-friendly activities in time for Earth Day on April 22. Start scrolling and check out our resources for a variety of interests. 

Test your knowledge! How much do you know about dairy sustainability?

Quick facts about dairy farming in Connecticut:

  • Connecticut dairy farmers care for 67,000 acres of land, helping to maintain Connecticut’s beautiful landscapes.
  • Connecticut dairy provides 12,277 direct jobs, contributing more than $547 million to local economies.
  • In the past five years, dairy farmers have given $353,000 to improve school meal programs in the state.
  • Milk is one of the original farm-to-table foods, typically arriving on local grocery shelves in just 48 hours (sometimes less!) from dairy farms in our region.
  • There are several ways dairy farmers reuse manure, including using it as fertilizer on their fields, turning it into compost, and converting it into clean, renewable electricity. A Connecticut dairy farmer even invented CowPots – a biodegradable planting pot made from cow poo.

Dairy’s Surprising Tie to Renewable Energy

The U.S. dairy industry is committing to carbon neutrality by 2050. See how dairy farmers are using “cow power”—among other sustainable practices like manure management—to ensure dairy is part of the environmental solution.

Learn More

DIY Milk Jug & Carton Planters

Upcycle your plastic milk jugs and cardboard milk cartons with this spring craft that kids will love!

More DIY Activities for Kids

3 Reasons to Include Dairy in a Plant-Based Diet

People are starting to wonder how their food choices impact the environment. The truth is, our food system is complicated and plants and dairy foods are highly connected. Without dairy, emission reductions would be minimal and it would eliminate a great source of accessible and affordable nutrient-rich foods.

Learn More

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